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FAQS

 

WHAT IS CURRENTLY BEING CONSTRUCTED?

Construction will commence on the northern portion of the overall Kāʻeo project, located north of Honoiki Street.  This portion of the  project entails the development of 21 single-family custom home lots on 21.6 acres, of which roughly 11 acres will be graded for homesites, common area landscaping, roads, drainage basins, and other infrastructure. The ungraded areas (roughly ten acres) will undergo selective removal of invasive trees and be replaced with native vegetation before being placed in preservation in accordance with the State Department of Land and Natural Resources.

HOW LONG WILL THE PROJECT TAKE TO CONSTRUCT?

Dust fencing around the project perimeter will be erected in May 2022. Project construction is anticipated to last until Fall 2023.

WILL THERE BE ANY IMPACT TO PUBLIC PARKING DURING CONSTRUCTION?

No, the dust and silt fences will be erected on private property and outside of the County of Maui road right- of-way, which currently houses all public off-street parking along Honoiki Street and Makena-Keoneʻōʻio Road. The construction entrance for the project will be located off of Makena Alanui Road.

WILL HONOIKI STREET OR ANY OTHER PUBLIC ROADS BE CLOSED DURING CONSTRUCTION?

No. Public roads will remain open during construction and there are no current plans for area road closures during this portion of construction. Area travelers should be careful when approaching the project site as heavy equipment and other construction vehicles will be accessing the site.

WILL CONSTRUCTION OCCUR AT NIGHT?

No. Project construction will occur during weekday business hours between 7:00 am to 5:30 pm. There is currently no plan for nighttime or weekend work. Should there be a need for any nighttime or weekend work a noise permit would need to be completed and public notification would occur.

WHAT IS BEING DONE TO ADDRESS ANY PROJECT-RELATED IMPACTS TO INFRASTRUCTURE?

A Special Management Area Use Permit was granted in 2017 in which a number of conditions were imposed by the County of Maui.  The SMA use permit was amended in 2021 with a further reduction in density and the expansion of preservation areas. The County of Maui issued a grading permit for this project in March 2022. Extensive engineering best management practices (BMPs) will be employed prior to construction and will be monitored throughout construction.

WILL BLASTING OF ROCK BE NECESSARY DURING CONSTRUCTION?

 No blasting is planned for this project.

DOES THIS PHASE OF THE PROJECT INVOLVE ANY PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS OUTSIDE OF THE DUST FENCE, SUCH AS ALONG PUBLIC ROADWAYS?

 No. The extent of this portion of the construction is within private property boundaries. However, the landowner is pursuing County of Maui approvals to improve the off-street parking and other infrastructure along both Honoiki Street and Makena-Keoneʻōʻio Road. Upon County of Maui approval, work will commence on those improvements. 

HOW WILL ACCESS FOR GENERAL PUBLIC TO MĀKENA LANDING BE PRESERVED AND IMPROVED BY THE PROJECT?

 Public access to Makena Landing and the parking lot will not be affected. The number of public stalls will stay the same. In addition, the proposed project plans to  improve neighboring roadways through better pedestrian access, and cycling circulation. A total of twenty-nine (29) beach parking stalls shall be provided along Honoiki Street (19 stalls) and Makena-Keoneoio Road (10 stalls). 

HOW DOES THE PLAN MANAGE STORMWATER?

Low Impact Development (LID) is a new approach to development that uses ecological design techniques such as Green Stormwater Infrastructure (GSI) to remove pollutants and recharge groundwater supplies onsite. Some of the GSI techniques used on this project include permeable pavement, vegetated swales, and bioretention systems (also known as rain gardens). The stormwater management system is designed to not only retain the 50-year 1-hr storm like a traditional drainage plan might, but it also treats the runoff generated from a 100-year 1-hr storm.

HOW ARE YOU PLANNING TO MITIGATE  RUNOFF DURING CONSTRUCTION?

The contractor is dedicated to minimizing construction runoff on this project. The BMPs they have in place are robust and prepared to handle a heavy rain event. They will be inspecting all BMPs, discharge locations, and piles of soil/rock prior to a rain event and as part of their daily construction site routine. A regular inspection of BMPs will catch any issues prior to an unexpected rain event.  


As an additional safeguard, a third-party will be conducting random quarterly inspections of the BMPs on the construction site, per the SMA requirements for the project. This helps ensure good housekeeping.  


Lastly, monitoring of near-shore water will be occurring during construction. A monitoring buoy has been installed in the ocean directly ma kai of the Kāʻeo project area, and collects turbidity data in real-time. The automated probes will send a notification if the turbidity levels exceed a pre-programmed threshold. If this occurs, the developer and contractor will be notified so that any unintentional malfunctions in BMPs may be immediately addressed. The turbidity data will be reported out monthly. 

DID THE PROJECT UNDERGO ARCHAEOLOGY REVIEW?

Yes. The project has undergone extensive archaeological review.  An archaeological inventory survey (AIS) was approved for the project by the State Historic Preservation Division (SHPD) in 2015. Since that time, extensive engagement with community included walking the land with various stakeholders such as lineal and cultural descendants, Office of Hawaiian Affairs and concerned citizens. This engagement resulted in an agreement with archaeologists for additional study. Since the initial AIS approval, further work via a supplemental AIS (SAIS) occurred and the SAIS was approved by the SHPD in 2020. In addition, a Preservation Plan (PP) and an Archaeological Monitoring Plan (AMP) were approved by the SHPD to further protect archaeological and cultural resources on the property. In accordance with the AMP, during earthmoving activities, archaeological monitors will be on-site to advise equipment operators if additional archaeological or cultural properties are found. In an effort to steward archaeological sites today and in the future, the landowner is collaborating with  ‘Āina Archaeology to host the Kīpaipai Program, a mentor-ship program designed  to empower and support descendants with lineal and genealogical ties to Honuaʻula to tell the stories and to care for the preserved archaeological sites from Palauea to ʻĀhihi and from ʻUlupalakua to Kahoʻolawe. Mākena has also established an ʻŌiwi Resources department designed to expand cultural programing and land stewardship at the club and surrounding areas.